K-12 Science Curriculum

 

The Meade School District 46-1 Science Curriculum will provide a challenging standards-based science

instruction for all students. Students will demonstrate proficiency in Nature of Science, Physical Science,

Life Science, Earth/Space Science, and Science, Technology, Environment, and Society. The curriculum

is based on the South Dakota Science Content Standards specifying the understanding, knowledge, and

skills students are expected to achieve in their K-12 academic career. Standards articulate an essential

core of knowledge and skills and are the year-end K-12 learning results.

 

The district curriculum aligns with the current South Dakota Science Content Standards.

·         The bulleted items indicate a condensed version of sequential proficiencies required for

the grade level cited.

·         Concept introduction is indicated by an asterisk (*) in grades 9 through 12.

Mastery of the complete standard will be addressed in a sequential course.

 

Complete curriculum information for any stated grade level is available through science teachers’

 course planners. Visit the state website for complete detailed information

 http://www.state.sd.us/deca/OCTA/contentstandards/index.htm.

 

 Assessments Key Codes for Science Curriculum:

(H) Hands-on – Experiments/lab, presentations, projects, performance practical

(T) Tests – Book tests, teacher made tests and quizzes, standardized tests and quizzes, Foss kits

(O) OtherTeacher’s observations, written reports, oral conference, cooperative learning, workshops

 

Kindergarten, First, and Second Grades

 

The bulleted items indicate mastery for the grade level cited.

Kindergarten

First Grade

Second Grade

 

All students will:

 

Nature of Science

Kindergarten through grade 5 students do not master standards for Nature of Science. Proficiency of this content area emerges from grade 6 upward.

 

Physical Science

·      Use senses to describe solid objects in terms of physical attributes.  (H, O)

·      Identify water in solid and liquid form.  (H)

 

Life Science

·      Sort living and non-living things. (H, O)

 

 

 

 

 

Earth Science

·      Describe simple earth patterns in daily life. (H, O)

 

Science, Technology,

Environment, and Society

·      Recognize technology. (O)

·      Care for the environment properly. (O)

·      Recognize ways to use various materials. (O)

 

 

 

All students will:

 

Nature of Science

Kindergarten through grade 5 students do not master standards for Nature of Science. Proficiency of this content area emerges from grade 6 upward.

 

Physical Science

·    Categorize objects by physical attributes such as color, size, and shape. (H, T, O)

·    Compare objects in terms of heavier or lighter.  (T, H, O)

·    Predict how common materials interact with water.  (T, H, O)

·    Describe relative position of objects.  (T, H, O)

 

 

 

 

Life Science

·    Discover life needs of green plants. (H, O)

·    Identify the parts of a plant. (T, O)

·    List life needs of animals, including people. (T, O)

·    Describe physical similarities and differences between parents and their offspring.  (T, O)

·    Relate characteristics of plants and animals that allow them to live in specific habitats.  (T, H, O)

 

Earth/Space Science

·    Recognize changes in weather over time. (O, H)

·    Describe rocks in terms of properties .(H, O)

 

Science, Technology,

Environment, and Society

·    Investigate natural resources and their uses. (H, O)

·    Describe ways technology makes life easier. (O)

·    Investigate how to recycle and reuse natural resources. (O)

·    Identify how technology has helped people solve everyday problems. (O)

·    Develop personal habits that display concern for the environment. (O)

 

 

 

All students will:

 

Nature of Science

Kindergarten through grade 5 students do not master standards for Nature of Science. Proficiency of this content area emerges from grade 6 upward.

 

Physical Science

·    Classify solids in terms of the materials they are made of.  (T, H, O)

·    Describe visually observable properties of liquids.  (T, H, O)

·    Classify liquids by their physical properties.  (T, H, O)

·    Identify mixtures of solid substances and ways to separate them.  (T, H, O)

 

 

 

 

·    Demonstrate how moving objects exhibit different types of motion.  (T, H, O)

·    Predict the effects of magnets on other magnets and on other objects. (T, H, O)

·    Compare sounds in terms of high pitch, low pitch, loud and soft. (H, O, T)

 

Life Science

·    Classify plants according to similarities and differences. (H, O, T)

·    Classify people and animals according to similarities and differences. (H, T, O)

·    Describe the life cycle of flowering plants.  (T, O)

·    Compare life cycles of various living things.  (T, O) 

·    Describe ways that plants and animals depend on each other.  (O, H, T)

·    Describe adaptations in plants and animals in response to seasonal changes.  (T, O)

·    Recognize what it means for a species to be extinct or endangered. (T, O)

 

Earth/Space Science

·    Describe types and patterns of weather during different seasons. (H, O, T)

·    Identify and locate geological features using maps and globes. (H, O, T)

·    Recognize and distinguish between forms of water in the earth system. (H, O, T)

 

Science, Technology,

Environment, and Society

·    Explore how technology has changed daily life. (H, O)

·    Model the 3 R’s.  (Reduce, reuse and recycle) (O)

 

 


Third, Fourth, and Fifth Grades

 


The bulleted items indicate mastery for the grade level cited.

Third Grade

Fourth Grade

Fifth Grade

 

All students will:

 

Nature of Science

Kindergarten through grade 5 students do not master standards for Nature of Science. Proficiency of this content area emerges from grade 6 upward.

 

Physical Science

·      Describe physical properties of matter using senses. (H, T, O)

·      Relate composition to physical properties. (H, T, O)

·      Demonstrate how a substance can be made by combining two or more substances. (H, T, O)

·      Define energy and differentiate between sources of renewable and nonrenewable energy. (H, T, O)

·      Demonstrate how sound consists of vibration and pitch. (H, O)

·      Identify how sound is used as a means of communication. (H, T, O)

 

Life Science

·      Identify the basic structures and functions of plants in relationship to their environment. (H, T, O)

·      Identify characteristic features of animals in relationship to their environment. (H, T, O)

·      Describe the life cycles of familiar organisms. (H, T, O)

·      Explain how animals instinctively meet basic needs in their environment. (H, T, O)

·      Describe how species depend on one another for survival. (H, T, O)

·      Explain how environments support a diversity of plants and animals. (H, T, O)

·      Describe ways humans impact air, water, and habitat quality. (H, T, O)

·      Examine fossils and how they provide evidence of change. (H, T, O)

 

 

 

Earth/Space Science

·      Identify the difference between a rock and a mineral. (H, T, O)

·      Describe how humans use earth’s natural resources. (H, T, O)

·      Describe how the earth is one of several planets that orbit the sun. (T, O)

·      Recognize how the appearance of the moon changes over time. (H, T, O)

Science, Technology,

Environment, and Society

·      Recognize ways to recycle, reuse, and reduce natural resources. (H, T, O)

 

All students will:

 

Nature of Science

Kindergarten through grade 5 students do not master standards for Nature of Science. Proficiency of this content area emerges from grade 6 upward.

 

Physical Science

·    Describe observable, physical changes and properties in matter. (H, T, O)

·    Explain how some physical properties remain the same as the mass is changed. (H, O)

·    Differentiate between the states of matter caused by temperature using water. (H, O)

·    Demonstrate how forces act over a distance. (H, O)

·    Identify material as being conductors or insulators of electricity. (H, O)

·    Construct and define a simple circuit. (H, O)

·    Define magnets and their properties. (H, T, O)

 

Life Science

·    Identify the basic systems and major organs. (H, T, O)

·    Differentiate between vertebrates and invertebrates. (H, T, O)

·    Identify behavioral and structural adaptations that allow plant or animal to survive. (H, T, O)

·    Explain how the size of the population is dependent upon its resources. (H, T, O)

·    Describe a flow of energy through a food chain and web. (H, T, O)

 

Earth/Space Science

·    Describe the basic stages of the water cycle. (H, T, O)

·    Describe how weather can be predicted. (HTO)

·    Explain the motion of the earth, sun and moon. (HTO)

 

 

Science, Technology,

Environment, and Society

·    Describe how people continue to invent to solve problems. (H, T, O)

·    Explain how new ideas and inventions affect people. (H, T, O)

 

All students will:

 

Nature of Science

Kindergarten through grade 5 students do not master standards for Nature of Science. Proficiency of this content area emerges from grade 6 upward.

 

Physical Science

·    Define matter on the basis of observable physical properties such as: mass, volume, density, magnetism, electricity, and sound. (H, O)

·    Identify forces in specific situations that require objects to interact, change, or stop. (H, T, O,)

·    Analyze the structure and design of simple and compound machines to determine how machines make work easier by trading force for distance. (H, T, O)

·    Describe basic properties of light. (H, T, O)

·    Describe sun’s ability to produce energy in forms of light and heat. (H, T, O)

 

Life Science

·    Describe basic process of photosynthesis and the role of light as a source of energy in plants. (T, O).

·    Predict physical characteristics with family lineages. (O)

·    Describe how interrelationships enable some organisms to survive. (H, T, O)

·    Describe structures, life cycles, and processes involved in plant reproduction. (H, T, O)

·    Using an energy pyramid model, analyze roles of organisms to determine transfer of energy. (H, T, O)

·    Describe how natural events and human influences may help or harm ecosystems. (H, O)

 

 

Earth/Space Science

·    Describe the basic structure of earth’s interior. (T, O)

·    Describe the components of the solar system (sun, planet, moons). (H, T, O)

·    Explain how the earth’s rotation affects the appearance of the sky. (H, T, O)

 

Science, Technology,

Environment, and Society

·    Identify scientific changes that have affected the improvements science has made on transportation, health, sanitation, and communication. (H, T, O)

·    Describe how designing a solution may have constraints. (H, T, O)

·    Explain the interrelationships of populations, resources, and environments (H,T,O)

 

 


Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Grades

 

The bulleted items indicate mastery for the grade level cited.

Sixth Grade

Seventh Grade

Eighth Grade

Grade six standards emphasize an integration of Physical, Life and Earth/Space Science.

 

All students will:

 

Nature of Science

·   Explain how scientific knowledge and processes have evolved over time. (H, T, O)

·   Understand the need for continual re-evaluation of scientific knowledge. (H, T, O)

·   Examine the scientific contributions of various cultures. (H, T, O)

·   Describe the limits of accuracy of a particular measuring device or measurement procedure. (H, T, O)

·   Manipulate one variable over time with repeated trials to test a hypothesis. (H, T, O)

·   Construct and interpret graphs from data to make predictions. (H, T, O)

·   Use research methods to investigate practical and/or personal scientific problems and questions. (H, T, O)

·   Use appropriate scientific equipment for investigations. (H, T, O)

·   Use proper safety procedures in all investigations. (H, T, O)

 

Physical Science

·   Understand that all matter is made up of atoms containing electrons, protons, and neutrons. (H, T, O)

·   Classify materials as elements, compounds, or mixtures. (H, T, O)

·   Analyze the relationship among mass, weight, volume, and density. (H, T, O)

·   Compare and contrast mixtures, compounds, and elements. (H, T, O)

·   Investigate and describe how matter can change. (H, T, O)

·   Describe how push/pull forces acting on objects can either reinforce, oppose, or have no effect on each other. (H, T, O)

 

 

 

·   Demonstrate how all forces have magnitude and direction. (H, T, O)

·   Describe and graphically represent the motion of objects in terms of direction and/or position in relation to time. (H, T, O)

·   Investigate and describe types and sources of energy (ex. potential/ kinetic, mechanical, heat, electrical/ nuclear). (H, T, O)

·   Identify types of energy transform-ations (ex. mechanical to electrical, chemical to light). (H, T, O)

·   Explain basic concepts of electricity (ex. sources, relationship to magnetism, types of current and circuits, and ways to measure electricity). (H, T, O)

·   Investigate the properties of light (electromagnetic spectrum). (H, T, O)

 

Life Science

·   Describe basic cell structures and related functions. (H, T, O)

·   Identify basic parts of plant and animal cells (ex. nucleus, cytoplasm, chloroplast, cell membrane, cell wall). (H, T, O)

·   Understand that cells are the building blocks of living things. (H, T, O)

·   Identify the basic life processes that occur in cells (ex. growth, energy, reproduction, waste elimination). (H, T, O)

·   Describe the difference between a hybrid and purebred organism. (H, T, O)

·   Describe the reproduction process for various organisms and its importance to the survival of the given species. (H, T, O)

·   Investigate how variation in each species is due to the exchange and interaction of genetic information as it is passed from parent to offspring. (H, T, O)

·   Investigate the process of energy transformation in photosynthesis. (H, T, O)

 

 

 

 

·   Analyze how organisms depend on other organisms and on the nonliving components of the environment. (H, T, O)

·   Describe the roles of producers, consumers and decomposers in a system. (H, T, O)

·   Analyze energy use in food webs and food pyramids. (H, T, O)

·   Model cycles in ecosystems (ex. water, carbon dioxide/oxygen, nitrogen). (H, T, O)

·   Explain the importance and scientific use of a classification system. 

 

Earth/Space Science

·   Describe the spheres of the earth and their composition (ex. lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere). (H, T, O)

·   Analyze the role of water in all three states in shaping earth. (H, T, O)

·   Investigate and describe major geologic processes that shaped the Earth’s landscape. (H, T, O)

·   Understand the organization of the solar system and the relationships among the various bodies that comprise it (ex. sun, moon, Earth, other planets and their moons, meteors, asteroids, comets). (H, T, O)

·   Interpret topographic and digital maps to identify surface features. (H, T, O

 

Science, Technology,

Environment, and Society

·   Discuss science issues (ex. cloning, aging, farming, mining, timber). (H, T, O)

·   Determine how science helps drive research and provides knowledge for better understanding. (H, T, O)

·   Explain how society and need can affect the direction taken by science. (H, T, O)

·   Determine scientific advancements that have had an impact on the environment. (H, T, O)

·   Determine the importance of public access to scientific discoveries. (H, T, O)

 

 

·   Identify ways that medical tech-nologies have affected life (ex. x-rays, vaccines, stethoscopes). (H, T, O)

·   Investigate the possible consequences of various alternative decisions for technology-related issues. (H, T, O)

·   Discuss a solution for a problem or a need. (H, T, O)

·   Describe the role of technology in developing natural resources. (H, T, O)

 

 

Grade seven standards emphasize Life Science.

 

 

All students will:

 

Nature of Science

·    Analyze societal response to major scientific findings or theories (ex. Einstein’s, Galileo’s, Madame Curie’s). (O)

·    Understand the need for continual re-evaluation of scientific knowledge. (T, O)

·    Investigate uses of hypotheses in science (ex. evaluating relevance of data, determining data to be obtained, interpreting old and new data directly, and identifying the need for new information). (T)

·    Evaluate the conclusions to scientific investigations. (T)

·    Determine the limits of accuracy inherent in a particular measuring device or procedure. (H)

·    Control variables to test hypotheses by repeated trials. (H, T)

·    Identify sources of experimental error. (H)

·    Interpret to make predictions and/or justify conclusions. (H, T, O)

·    Use research methods to investigate practical and/or personal scientific problems and questions. (H, T, O)

·    Demonstrate appropriate use of apparatus and technologies for investigations. (H, T, O)

·    Use proper safety procedures in all investigations. (H, T, O)

 

Life Science

·    Relate types of cells to their specialized structure and function (ex. nerve cells, muscle cells). (H, T)

·    Demonstrate how structures and functions of cells, tissues, organs, and body systems relate to each other. (H, T, O)

 

 

 

·    Compare and contrast plant and animal cells. (H, T, O)

·    Recognize the need for organized classification systems in the study of plant and animal life. (H, T, O)

·    Describe factors that determine species (ex. reproductive viability, physical characteristics, genetic code). (H, T, O)

·    Compare and contrast sexual and asexual reproduction in plants and animals. (H, T, O)

·    Identify limiting factors that impact animal and plant populations. (H, O)

·    Identify population disturbances and various factors that threaten or enhance a species survival. (H, O)

·    Describe processes by which matter and energy flow through an ecosystem. (H)

·    Explain the effects of environmental changes on dynamic equilibrium in physical and biological systems. (H)

·    Explain different relationships among living organisms (ex. competition, symbiosis, producer/ consumer/decomposer, predator/prey). (H)

·    Investigate interactions among populations in a biological community (ex. relationships among producers, consumers, and decomposers in food chains and food webs). (H)

·    Model cycles on ecosystems (ex. water, carbon dioxide/oxygen, nitrogen). (H, O)

 

Science, Technology,

Environment, and Society

·    Discuss science issues (ex. cloning, aging, farming, mining, timber). (O)

·    Investigate how science helps drive research and provide knowledge for better understanding. (O)

·    Describe how society and need can affect the direction taken by science. (O)

·    Describe scientific advancements that have had an impact on the environment. (O)

 

 

·    Explain the importance of public access to scientific discoveries. (O)

·    Analyze health recommendations concerning nutrition and drugs. (H, T, O)

·    Determine the risks associated with natural and biological hazards. (H, O)

·    Describe the possible consequences of various alternative decisions for technological-related issues. (H, O)

·    Design a solution or product for a problem or a need considering constraints (ex. cost, time, materials, and environmental/societal trade-off). (H, O)

Grade eight standards emphasize Earth/Space Science.

 

 

All students will:

 

Nature of Science

·    Explain how scientific theory, hypothesis generation, and experimentation are interrelated. (H, T)

·    Analyze the scientific contributions of various men and women within specific fields of science. (H, T, O)

·    Analyze uses of hypothesis in scientific investigations (ex. evaluating relevance of data, determining data to be obtained, interpreting old and new data, identifying the need for further information). (H, O)

·    Understand the limits of accuracy inherent in a particular measuring device or procedure. (H, T)

·    Control variables to test hypotheses by repeated trials and by identifying sources of experimental error. (H, O)

·    Interpret data to justify predictions or conclusions. (H, T, O)

·    Use research methods to investigate practical and/or personal scientific problems and questions. (O)

·    Select appropriate scientific equipment and technologies for investigations and experiments. (H, O)

·    Use proper safety procedures in all investigations. (H, O)

 

Physical Science

·    Analyze the characteristics of types of matter based on physical and chemical properties (ex. elements, compounds, mixtures, acids, bases, salts, organic, inorganic, solids, liquids, and gases). (H, T)

·    Describe the relationship between the organization and the predictive nature of the periodic table. (H, T)

 

 

·    Investigate various models of atomic structure including Lewis, Bohr and electron-cloud (quantum) models. (T)

·    Create equations which describe chemical reactions. (T)

 

Earth/Space Science

·    Analyze the role of plate tectonics in shaping Earth. (H, T, O)

·    Investigate and understand that many aspects of Earth’s history can be inferred by studying rocks and fossils. (H, T, O)

·    Analyze the effects of density differences and energy transfer on the activities of the atmosphere, oceans, and Earth’s interior. (H, T)

·    Analyze how energy transfer between the sun, Earth, and the Earth’s atmosphere drive weather and climate on Earth. (H, T)

·    Predict the potential impact of human activities on long- range changes in surface and climate of the Earth (ex. rain forest, clear cutting, El Nino). (H, T)

·    Investigate theories related to the origin and evolution of the solar system, galaxy, and the universe. (T, O)

·    Describe the origin of stars and of stellar systems. (T, O)

·    Describe the components of the universe. (T, O)

·    Relate the discovery of the speed of light to how distance is measured in the universe. (T, O)

·    Investigate apparent relationships among various components of the universe. (T, O)

 

Science, Technology,

Environment, and Society

·    Analyze science issues (ex. cloning, aging, farming, mining, timber). (H, T, O)

·    Explain how science helps drive research and provides knowledge for better understanding. (H, T, O)

 

 

 

·    Determine how cultural backgrounds and beliefs of different groups can affect scientific thinking. (T, O)

·    Analyze how society and need can affect the direction taken by science. (T, O)

·    Analyze scientific advancements that have had an impact on the environment. (T, O)

·    Analyze the importance of public access to scientific discoveries. (T, O)

·    Explain the importance of testing technology and products of technology in a controlled setting before submission to the general public. (T, O)

·    Analyze the possible consequences of various alternative decisions for technological related issues. (T, O)

·    Investigate and discuss public policy decisions relating to the environment. (T, O)

 


Ninth through Twelfth Grades

 

The bulleted items indicate mastery for the grade level cited.

Ninth Grade

Tenth Grade

Eleventh and Twelfth Grades

Elective classes for grades 11th and 12th

 

Physical Science

 

All students will:

 

Nature of Science

·      Evaluate a scientific discovery to determine and describe how societal, cultural and personal beliefs influence scientific investigations and interpretations. (O, T) *

·      Develop the role of observation and evidence in the development and modification of hypotheses, theories and laws. (T, H, O) *

·      Applies science process skills to design and conduct student investigations. (T, H, O) *

·      Manipulate multiple variables with repeated trials. (T, H, O) *

·      Demonstrate correct precision in measurements and calculations. (T, H, O) *

 

Physical Science

·      Use the periodic table to determine the atomic structure of elements, valence number, family relationships and regions. (metals, nonmetals and metalloids). (T, H, O) *

·      Describe ways that atoms combine. (T, H, O) *

·      Predict whether reactions will speed up or slow down as conditions change.  (T, H, O) *

·      Balance chemical equations by applying the Law of Conservation of Matter. (T, H, O) *

 

 

·      Distinguish among chemical, physical and nuclear changes.  (T, H, O) *

 

Motion

·      Apply concepts of distance and time to the quantitative relationships of motion using appropriate mathematical formulas, equations and units. (T, H, O) *

·      Predict motion of an object using Newton’s Laws. (T, O) *

·      Examine energy transfer as matter changes. (T, H, O) *

·      Relate concepts of force, distance and time to the quantitative relationships of work, energy and power.  (T, H, O) *

 

Energy and Matter

·      Describe the relationships among potential energy, kinetic energy and work as applied to the Law of Conservation of Energy. (T, H, O) *

·      Describe how characteristics of waves are related to one another. (T, H, O) *

·      Describe electrical effects in terms of motion and concentrations of charged particles. (T, H, O) *

 

Science, Technology, Environment, and Society

·      Explain ethical roles and responsibilities of scientists and scientific research. (O, T) *

·      Evaluate and describe the impact of scientific discoveries on historical events and social, economic and ethical issues.  (O, T) *

 

 

 

 

·      Describe immediate and long-term consequences of potential solutions for technological issues.(O, T) *

·      Analyze factors that could limit technological design. (T, H, O) *

 

Earth/ Space Science

·      Explain changes within the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and or atmosphere. (T, H, O) *

·      Analyze energy transfer and its effects on climate. (T, H, O) *

·      Describe Newtonian mechanics and explain the position and motion of our solar system. (T, H, O) *

 

Comparable proficiencies are addressed in the alternate course of Technical Physics.

 

Biology I

 

All students will:

 

Nature of Science

·      Evaluate a scientific discovery to determine and describe how societal, cultural, and personal beliefs influence scientific investigations and interpretations.  (H, O, T) *

·      Develop the role of observation and evidence in the development and modification of hypotheses, theories, and laws.  (H, O, T) *

·      Applies science process skills to design and conduct student investigations. (H, O, T) *

 

Physical Science

·      Describe ways that atoms combine.  (H, O, T) *

·      Predict whether reactions will speed up or slow down as conditions change. (H, O, T) *

 

        Life Science

·      Relate cellular functions and processes to specialized structures within cells. (H, O, T)

·      Classify organisms using characteristics and evolutionary relationship of major taxa and domains.  (H, O, T) *

·      Identify structures and function relationships within major taxa.  (H, O, T) *

 

 

 

 

·      Explain the physical and chemical processes of photosynthesis and cell respiration and their importance to plant and animal life.  (H, O, T)

·      Explain how gene expression regulates cell growth and differentiation.  (H, O, T) *

·      Predict inheritance patterns using a single allele.  (H, O, T)

·      Describe how genetic recombination, mutations and natural selection lead to adaptations, evolution, extinction or the emergence of new species. (H, O, T) *

·      Predict the results of complex inheritance patterns involving multiple alleles and genes.  (H, O, T)

·      Identify factors that can cause changes in stability of populations, communities and ecosystems. (H, O, T) *

 

Earth/Space Science

·      Explain how elements and compounds cycle between living and non-living systems.  (H, O, T) *

·      Describe how atmospheric chemistry may affect global climate.  (O, T) *

·      Assess how human activity has changed the land, ocean, and atmosphere of Earth.  (H, O, T) *

 

Science, Technology, Environment and Society

·      Explain ethical roles and responsibilities of scientists and scientific research.  (H, O, T) *

 

 

 

 

 

·      Evaluate and describe the impact of scientific discoveries on historical events and social, economic, and ethical issues.  (H, O, T) *

·      Describe immediate and long-term consequences of potential solutions for technological issues.  (H, O, T) *

·      Analyze factors that could limit technological design.  (O, T) *

·      Analyze and describe the benefits, limitations, cost and consequences involved in using, conserving, or recycling resources.  (H, O, T) *

 

 

Biology II

 

All students will:

 

Nature of Science

·      Evaluate a scientific discovery to determine and describe how societal, cultural, and personal beliefs influence scientific investigations and interpretations. (T, O)

·      Develop the role of observation and evidence in the development and modification of hypotheses, theories, and laws. (T, O)

·      Apply science process skills to design and conduct student investigations. (H, T, O)

·      Practice safe and effective laboratory techniques. (H, O)

·      Manipulate multiple variables with repeated trials. (H, O)

·      Use statistical analysis of data to evaluate the validity of results. (H, O)

·      Demonstrate correct precision in measurements and calculations. (H, O)

 

Physical Science

·      Predict whether reactions will speed up or slow down as conditions change. (H, T, O)

·      Distinguish among chemical, physical and nuclear changes. (H, T, O)

 

Life Science

·      Understand the fundamental structures, functions, classifications, and mechanisms found in living things. (H, T, O)

·      Describe how genetic recombination, mutations, and natural selection lead to adaptations, evolution, extinction, or the emergence of new species. (O, T)

·      Classify organisms using characteristics and evolutionary relationships of domains. (O)

·      Identify factors that can cause changes in stability of populations, communities, and ecosystems. (O, T)

·      Predict the impact of genetic changes in populations (mutation, natural selection and artificial selection, adaptation/extinction). (T, O)

·      Predict how life systems respond to changes in the environment. (T, O)

 

 

Earth/Space Science

·      Explain how elements and compounds cycle between living and non-living systems. (T, O)

·      Describe how atmospheric chemistry may affect global climate. (H, T, O)

·      Predict and assess how human activity has changed the land, ocean, and atmosphere of Earth. (T, O)

·      Explain how elements and compounds cycle between living and non-living systems. (T, O)

·      Predict the effect of an interruption in a given cycle. (T, O)

·      Explain how water, nitrogen, carbon, and oxygen cycle between living and non-living systems. (T, O)

·      Describe how various factors may affect global climate. (T, O)

 

Science, Technology, Environment and Society

·      Explain ethical roles and responsibilities of scientists and scientific research. (T, O)

·      Evaluate and describe the impact of scientific discoveries on historical events and social, economic, and ethical issues. (T, O)

·      Describe immediate and long-term consequences of potential solutions for technological issues. (T, O)

·      Analyze factors that could limit technological design. (T, O)

·      Analyze and describe the benefits, limitations, cost and consequences involved in using, conserving, or recycling resources. (H, T, O)

 

Advanced Placement Biology

 

Nature of Science

·      Evaluate a scientific discovery to determine and describe how societal, cultural, and personal beliefs influence scientific investigations and interpretations. (O)

·      Describe the role of observation and evidence in the development and modification of hypotheses, theories, and laws. (H, T, O)

·      Apply science process skills to design and conduct student investigations. (T, O, H)

·      Manipulate multiple variables with repeated trials. (H)

·      Use a control and change one variable at a time. (H)

·      Use statistical analysis of data to evaluate the validity of results. (H, O ,T)

·      Demonstrate correct precision in measurements and calculations. (H, T, O)

 

 

Physical Science

·      Predict whether reactions will speed up or slow down as conditions change. (T, H, O)

·      Examine energy transfer as matter changes. (T, H, O)

 

Life Science

·      Relate cellular functions and processes to specialized structures within cells. (H, O, T)

·      Classify organisms using characteristics and evolutionary relationship of major taxa. (H, O, T)

·      Identify structures and function relationships within major taxa. (O, T)

·      Explain the physical and chemical processes of photosynthesis and cell respiration and their importance to plant and animal life. (H, O, T)

·      Describe how living systems use biofeedback mechanisms to maintain homeostasis. (O, T)

·      Explain how gene expression regulates cell growth and differentiation. (T, O)

·      Identify factors that change the rates of enzyme catalyzed reactions. (H, O, T)

·      Classify organisms using characteristics and evolutionary relationships of domains. (O, T)

·      Predict inheritance of patterns using a single allele. (T, O, H)

·      Describe how genetic recombination, mutations, and natural selection lead to adaptations, evolution, extinction or the emergence of new species. (T, H, O)

·      Predict the results of complex inheritance patterns involving multiple alleles and genes. (H, O, T)

·      Identify factors that can cause changes in stability of populations, communities, and ecosystems. ( O, T)

·      Describe how having systems use biofeedback mechanisms to maintain homeostasis. (H, O, T)

 

Earth/Space Science

·      Explain how elements and compounds cycle between living and non-living systems. (H, T, O)

·      Describe how atmospheric chemistry may affect global climate. (O, T)

·      Assess how human activity has changed the land, ocean, and atmosphere of Earth. (T, O)

 

Comparable proficiencies are addressed in the alternate course of Human Anatomy.

 

 

 

Chemistry

 

Nature of Science

·      Evaluate a scientific discovery to determine and describe how societal, cultural, and personal beliefs influence scientific investigations and interpretations. (H, T, O)

·      Develop the role of observation and evidence in the development and modification of hypotheses, theories, and laws. (H, T, O)

·      Apply science process skills to design and conduct student investigations. (H, T, O)

·      Manipulate multiple variables with repeated trials. (H, O)

·      Use statistical analysis of data to evaluate the validity of results. (H, T, O)

·      Demonstrate correct precision in measurements and calculations. (H, T, O)

 

Physical Science

·      Use the periodic table to determine the atomic structure of elements, valence number, family relationships, and regions (metals, nonmetals, and metalloids). (H, T, O)

·      Describe ways that atoms combine. (H, T, O)

·      Predict whether reactions will speed up or slow down as conditions change. (H, O)

·      Balance chemical equations by applying the Law of Conservation of Matter. (H, T, O)

·      Distinguish among chemical, physical, and nuclear changes. (H, T, O)

·      Distinguish between the changing models of the atom using the historical experimental evidence. (O)

·      Predict electron configuration, ion formation, reactivity compound formation, periodic trends, and types of compounds formed based on location on the periodic table. (H, T, O)

·      Identify five basic types of chemical reactions and predict the products. (H, T, O)

·      Describe factors that affect solution interactions. (H, O)

·      Perform stoichiometric calculations. (H, T, O)

·      Apply the kinetic molecular theory to solve quantitative problems involving pressure, volume, temperature, and number of moles of gas. (H, T, O)

·      Use models to make predictions about molecular structure, chemical bonds, chemical reactivity, and polarity of molecules. (H, T, O)

 

 

Energy and Matter

·      Describe the relationships among potential energy, kinetic energy, and work as applied to the Law of Conservation of Energy. (H, O, T)

·      Describe how characteristics of waves are related to one another. (O) *

 

Science, Technology, Environment, and Society

·      Explain ethical roles and responsibilities of scientists and scientific research. (H, O)

·      Evaluate and describe the impact of scientific discoveries on historical events and social, economic, and ethical issues. (H, O)

·      Describe immediate and long-term consequences of potential solutions for technological issues. (H, O)

·      Analyze factors that could limit technological design. (H, O)

 

Organic Chemistry

 

Nature of Science

·      Evaluate a scientific discovery to determine and describe how societal, cultural, and personal beliefs influence scientific investigations and interpretations.  (H, T, O)

·      Develop the role of observation and evidence in the development and modification of hypotheses, theories, and laws.  (H, T, O)

·      Applies science process skills to design and conduct student investigations.  (H, O)

·      Demonstrate correct precision in measurements and calculations.  (H, O)

 

Physical Science

·      Describe ways that atoms combine.  (H, T, O)

·      Predict whether reactions will speed up or slow down as conditions change.  (H, T, O)

·      Balance chemical equations by applying the Law of Conservation of Matter. (H, T, O)

·      Distinguish among chemical, physical and nuclear changes.  (H, T, O)

·      Distinguish between the changing models of the atom using the historical experimental evidence.  (H, T, O)

·      Predict electron configuration, ion formation, reactivity compound formation, periodic trends, and types of compounds formed based on location on the periodic table.  (H, T, O)

 

 

 

·      Use models to make predictions about molecular structure, chemical bonds, chemical reactivity, and polarity of molecules.  (H, T, O)

 

Life Science

·      Identify factors that change the rates of enzyme catalyzed reactions.  (H, O)

 

Science, Technology, Environment and Society

·      Explain ethical roles and responsibilities of scientists and scientific research.  (H, O)

·      Evaluate and describe the impact of scientific discoveries on historical events and social, economic, and ethical issues.  (O)

·      Describe immediate and long-term consequences of potential solutions for technological issues.  (H, O)

·      Analyze factors that could limit technological design.  (H, O)

 

Advanced Placement Chemistry

 

Nature of Science

·      Evaluate a scientific discovery to determine and describe how societal, cultural, and personal beliefs influence scientific investigations and interpretations.  (H, T, O)

·      Develop the role of observation and evidence in the development and modification of hypotheses, theories, and laws.  (H, T, O)

·      Applies science process skills to design and conduct student investigations.  (H, T, O)

·      Manipulate multiple variables with repeated trials.  (H, O)

·      Use statistical analysis of data to evaluate the validity of results.  (H, O, T)

 

        Physical Science

·      Use the periodic table to determine the atomic structure of elements, valence number, family relationships, and regions (ex. metals, nonmetals, and metalloids). (H, T, O)

·      Describe ways that atoms combine.  (H, T, O)

·      Predict whether reactions will speed up or slow down as conditions change.  (H, T, O)

·      Balance chemical equations by applying the Law of Conservation of Matter.  (H, T, O)

·      Distinguish among chemical, physical and nuclear changes.  (H, T, O)

 

 

 

·      Demonstrate correct precision in measurements and calculations.  (H)

·      Distinguish between the changing models of the atom using the historical experimental evidence.  (T, O)

·      Predict electron configuration, ion formation, reactivity compound formation, periodic trends, and types of compounds formed based on location on the periodic table.  (H, T, O)

·      Identify five basic types of chemical reactions and predict the products.  (H, T, O)

·      Describe factors that affect solution interactions.  (H, T, O)

·      Perform stoichiometric calculations.  (H, T, O)

·      Apply the kinetic molecular theory to solve quantitative problems involving pressure, volume, temperature and number of moles of gas.  (H, T, O)

·      Use models to make predictions about molecular structure, chemical bonds, chemical reactivity, and polarity of molecules.  (H, O)

 

        Energy and Matter

·      Describe the relationships among potential energy, kinetic energy, and work as applied to the Law of Conservation of Energy.  (T, O)

·      Describe how characteristics of waves are related to one another.   (H, T, O)

 

        Science, Technology, Environment and Society

·      Explain ethical roles and responsibilities of scientists and scientific research.  (O)

 

Physics

 

Nature of Science

·      Evaluate a scientific discovery to determine and describe how societal, cultural, and personal beliefs influence scientific investigations and interpretations. (T, H, O)

·      Develop the role of observation and evidence in the development and modification of theories, hypotheses, and laws. (T, H, O)

·      Apply science process skills to design and conduct student investigations. (T, H, O)

·      Manipulate variables with repeated trials. (T, H, O)

·      Demonstrate correct precision in measurements and calculations. (T, H, O)

 

 

 

 

Physical Science

·      Examine energy transfer as matter changes. (T, H, O)

 

Motion

·      Apply concepts of distance and time to the quantitative relationships of motion using appropriate mathematical formulas, equations, and units. (T, H, O)

·      Predict motion of an object using Newton’s Laws. (T, H, O)

·      Relate concepts of force, distance, and time to the quantitative relationships of work, energy, and power. (T, H, O)

·      Solve vector problems graphically and analytically. (T, H, O)

·      Relate gravitational or centripetal force to projectile or uniform circular motion. (T, H, O)

 

Energy and Matter

·      Describe the relationships among potential energy, kinetic energy, and work as applied to the Law of Conservation of Energy. (H. T, O)

·      Describe how characteristics of waves are related to one another. (T, H, O)

·      Describe electrical effects in terms of motion and concentrations of charged particles. (T, H, O)

·      Explain wave behavior in the fundamental processes of reflection, refraction, diffraction, interference, resonance, and image formation. (T, H, O)

·      Describe the relationship between charged particles, static electricity, and electric fields. (T, H, O)

·      Describe the relationship between changing magnetic and electric fields. (T, H, O)

 

Science, Technology, Environment, and Society

·      Explain ethical roles and responsibilities of scientists and scientific research. (T, H, O)

·       Evaluate and describe the impact of scientific discoveries on historical events and social, economic, and ethical issues. (T, H, O)

·      Describe immediate and long-term consequences of potential solutions for technological issues. (T, H, O)

·      Analyze factors that could limit technological design. (T, H, O)